Google To Launch Youtube Music Key

Google will be launching its own subscription music service similar to Spotify and Spinner, according to online technology rumours. According to insiders, Google will call the service Youtube Music Key, which would offer ad-free playback, saving songs and videos for offline listening and audio-only interfaces for multitasking or background music for just $9.99 monthly.

The service is expected to have access to both Google Play and Youtube Music services. Similar to other music subscription providers, the Youtube music key will find lots of music including an artist’s concert footage, remixes, covers, aside from the usual palette of record albums. Insiders also said it is possible the paid service will include rare songs not found on other subscription services.

However, Google had launched its former Google Play Music Key, to its loss against major competition online. Youtube had pushed back the launch of Youtube Music Key in 2013 to focus on its design work.

Insiders have also yet to know the release date of the new service. They expect that the application will also allow free usage with advertisements and delays to save bandwidth for the service.

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David Bowie Promises More Music in the Upcoming Years

Psychedelic Rock Star David Bowie, who had made famous many singles two decades ago, had surprised the world with a 2013 single. However, he went back to the shadows after a year, but he promised new material to the world.

According to David Bowie’s statement, read out by a representative at a fundraising event in a bar at Denmark Alley, London, his dedication included the words, ‘More Music soon. David.’ The representative confirmed that Bowie had written the statement.

Bowie had intended to surprise the world in 2013 with his ‘The Next Day’ Album, evident in his lawsuits against studios who leaked his new music. The record instantly made number two in the US billboard charts and was on the top of the UK music charts.

Fans still anticipate Bowie to make live performances ever since his last performance in the years following 2000.

The rock star had made little appearances despite releasing his newest album in 2013.

Meanwhile, a film about the Victoria and Albert Museum’s David Bowie Exhibition may be released globally later this year. The Film was to celebrate the 50 years of David Bowie’s existence and contribution to music and performance.

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We May Be Losing the “Dirt” in Rock Music Today

Rock music’s themes circle around a penchant for looking at reality, the problems it has, and criticising what is happening, sometimes providing a solution for such. Rock is known to be dynamic, a no-holds-barred, strong-type of music that didn’t care however you want to see it as. But today, this kind of “dirt”, both technical and ideal, may be getting lost in modern rock music.

Partly to blame is the control given to the music producer. Nowadays, anybody can record their songs at home. Don’t own a drumset but want to record music? You could just buy an electronic drumset and start messing with your chops. I was really amazed when I saw one recording in action; the engineer didn’t like the timing, so she fixed the hihat timing with just a few clicks. The engineer also did not like the snare attack, so she controlled the MIDI velocity on the thing.

MIDI velocity. Twenty years ago, the world did not hear about that.

It is about this wild control that makes rock music precise to the metronome, which makes it sound “organic” yet “robotic” at the same time. When you listen to records today, the performance is so “clean” that the aesthetic value of the quality is criticised rather than the theme and idea presented in rock.

Call me old fashioned, but if rock is talking about the freedom of expression in one’s own way, the new additives and control of digital recording is like putting on good make-up to look like KISS or Japanese bands to look good for other people.

Rob Zombie Now Working on New Film “3l”

Rob Zombie has officially announced that he is working on his new horror flick titled “3l” that he plans to release within the following year. As the director of “House of 1,000 Corpses” and the more recent “Lords of Salem”, “3l” is expected to be disturbing and horrifying as his first movies.

His new film trailer features a disgruntling man wearing clown make-up and lasts for about two minutes. However, no plot has been explained in the trailer.

When fans asked about what the film is and its central plotline, Zombie replied to some commenters on his social network that the film will be as “nasty and disgusting.” Despite the resemblance of the clown character Captain Spalding in one of his films, he said that the movie was not a Captain Spalding prequel.

John 5, Rob Zombie’s guitarist in his band, will also be handling the musical score for the film as the guitarist confirmed this on Instagram.

Zombie will also be producing a film for his rock band fans entitled “The Zombie Horror Picture Show,” which is a concert DVD from his bands’ tour that would feature live footage from his songs. The DVD is set to release on May 19.

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Has Rock Music Become Too “Formulative?”

A formula is something we remember from chemistry class; if you have the formula, you could solve the equation. Formulas take out the magic in many things simply because it has become routine. Routines are a big no-no in creative, and rock is having its own routine.

Simplistic beats made up the form of the early rock genres, from those in Black Sabbath to Iron Maiden. These beats made you want to swing your hip ala Elvis, or bang your head in response to the steady rhythm that raises the pulse. These simplistic beats today have turned complicated, with more musicians interested in the genres of rock and metal using their musical knowledge to create something diverse.

While it achieves its magic and precision, and it is a treat to listen to them, the feeling that every note you listen to is pre-determined and calculated is what makes today’s rock and metal music more predictable, or if not predictable, then easily calculable .

Another note is that modern technologies help “clean up” the raw sound of a guitar, bass or drum part. Sometimes, and several musicians like me could attest to this, the human errors are what makes many instruments sound alive. They make records fun to listen to because the music was made by a human indeed.

Rock music had become more formulated because of the alignments in many phrases, the formulas used to express a certain guitar solo or passage. While alignment and symmetry is attractive, it eats away at the very core of rock music, which is the simplistic, natural vibe and strong emotions that go when listening to them.

Queen’s We Will Rock You Musical Closes After a Decade of Shows

With 12 years in its pocket and 4,600 performances viewed by a total of 6.5 million people, Queen’s “We Will Rock You” musical, which makes use of rock band Queen’s songs, will have its final show this year and finally close down. The longest running show at the Dominion Theatre in Edinburgh, it will have defeated Grease, which the theatre featured during 1993 to 1996 and had been performed to at least 15 million.

“We Will Rock You” opened in the theatre on May 14, 2002. The musical was directed by Christopher Renshaw, choreography by Arlene Philips. The Cast include Nigel Planer and Kerry Ellis.

The musical is set in 2032, where a young, rebellious teenager in 2302 seeks the “Holy Axe” and “Lost Riff” in a world that has no real music.

Upon its release, the musical received mixed reviews. Some critics said that the musical portrayed how Queen’s music could inspire grandiose and powerful settings and production albeit being expensive. Others said that it was an “adolescent and pathetic piece of work that dreads for hours.”

Despite its low critical reviews, audiences continued to flock the musical.

Queen’s music, along with its iconic performer Freddy Mercury, had become famous during the 70s for their powerful performances and the introduction of Broadway-like passages to then-classic rock music.

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Avoiding Compensation Claim Troubles: Keep the Music Down When You Drive

My cousin may have had a hard time getting compensation for a busted elbow and pair of ribs, but he exorbitantly helped the UK courts know that loud music or vehicle nuisance could be a reason for claiming for car accident compensation.

It happened this way: my cousin was on his way home from work during 5AM in the United Kingdom. You probably know about vehicles which have booming basses which play so loud they ram through vehicle windshields and windows. This one vehicle hit my cousin and it ran away quickly.

Luckily for my cousin, the police also captured the vehicle for nuisance due to the loud vehicle stereos. After he got hit, a pedestrian called an ambulance and he recovered in a few weeks. Police who reported had tied his incident to the rushing vehicle with the loud booming music.

However, during the time for compensation claims, the offender’s legal representative said that my cousin was at fault because he was crossing the street when the vehicle ran him over. His no win no fee claim expert said that the other party is still at fault because it is the only cause of my cousin’s injury, something that the police agreed with as in conjunction with frustrated manslaughter in case the offender did not provide compensation.

It took a gruelling process of presenting evidences before the offender finally provided £30,000 in damages including loss of wages for my cousin.

Keeping an Open Mind in Listening to Rock Music

Rock music will continue to be a staple of the world’s music. Many of us may be coming from alternative rock, pop rock or light rock, but rock has more genres than ever before. What Elvis started as a hip-swinging type of dance music became something that allowed me to bash my head against the wall and my body against other people who enjoy the music like me. However, the problem is that some of us become elitist when listening to our favourite genre.

It is understandable when you want to raise the value of the genre you’re listening to. If you’re for 80’s glam rock, you would indubitably invite your friends to listen to the genre. However, when you’re still in high school, it is unsurprising that you would tell your friends 80’s glam is better than today’s form of rock music.

However, this high-school behaviour had actually risen to the fan level. Even the most mature fans will always say the time rock, or metal, during their time were the best. When an 80’s glam band decides to become thrash, the fan in the second paragraph will predictably condemn them automatically because of this particular culture.

You can say that it is because of trend; that fans will associate a certain band for their signature sound, feature or even clothing will make any change blasphemous.

However, the evolution and love for the music could cultivate even more if fans and artists continue to accept the new ideas of the younger generations in the formation of rock music, and any gender in particular.

It takes an open mind to make new discoveries, which give way to new ideas.

Why Rock Would Suck Without Its Loudness

Rock music had become something different in its early days of rock and roll. People were not used to the simplistic, rhythm and groove-driven note progressions and beats. Today, its beat becomes harder as it pulsates with blasting kick drums, bass and gruellingly-technical guitars that give you more notes than you could chew.

 

Rock music’s evolution and feel evolves as more emphasis on the beat is given, and in simple audio production terms, loud compression allows for further excitement of the ears to simulate a live experience on a recorded album.

Early rock recordings, namely hard rock, during the 70s and towards the 80s, sounded very different in terms of loudness. Compression was a way to avoid having clipping in many old recordings. Today, it is used as an effect to “bind” together a track’s dynamics, which will increase its volume.

According to audio producers, especially those in the past, killing the dynamics of an entire mix through loud compression is something that can be tiring to the ears of a listener and makes the music sound flat. But rock music is supposed to be loud right?

For the average listener, flatness and other audio technicalities is not always a problem. If it is loud, then it has to be loud. Early rock recordings are underappreciated because they weren’t loud enough for their listeners. Rock would definitely suck without good compression, else how would anybody hear the bass guitar?

Cat Stevens Picked for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Cat Stevens said that he appreciated very much how people liked his music because it came as a surprise to him to be inducted into the famous Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He will be sharing his seat with Kiss, Black Sabbath and other famous bands and musicians who had played and will remain classic for years to come.

Cat Stevens, also known as Yusuf Islam, said that he never thought of having a position in the Hall of Fame, let alone be “shaking hands with Kiss’ lead singer. However, he felt honoured. He said that anything not music-related in the music business is something else to him. He said that even without the reward, he would continue to create music because the entire activity is the reward in itself.

He also said that he wishes he could make it to the awarding ceremony, given his own performance schedules to take care of. He admits that the Hall of Fame was “another world” to him and that his music is not quite “Rock and Roll”.
Cat Stevens also announced that he will be making a new album and that his faith in Islam coincides with his singing career

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